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Poster: Noah 8-? Date: Feb 23, 2010 4:44am
Forum: feature_films Subject: PD & Stautes of Limitations

I see a MESS o' contributions from the U.S. being Re-copywrighted but doesn't Great Britian have a law that sez that ANYTHING 50 years or older is PD?

50 years...mmmmm That would mean that anything BEFORE 1961 in Great Britian is PD.

Man oh Man. If applied here that would mean that the Mickey Mouse Club, Fury (w/ Bobby Diamond), Hennesy (Jackie Cooper), western tv shows up the gazoo, and so many other tv shows would be PD - PLUS - So very many Elvis movies. Oh, yeah... An' Jerry Lewis movies.... There must be a dozen or so of Jerry an' Dino before they went their seperate ways. (Didn't Dino make a couple of spy or PI efforts?)

Surely there must be a BUNCH of classics & musicals still unposted that are PD.... just the ting for us old fuds that prefer fluff-and-nonsense to the emotional - sensational present fair.
Noah
8-?

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Poster: norfolkman Date: Feb 23, 2010 5:05am
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: PD & Stautes of Limitations

My understanding is that the BBC jealously guard their copyright on everything they make and that they have a department that keeps copyrights updated. For that reason I am surprised to see so much from the BBC in the archives under Public Domain. Both in audio and visuals, we would never get away with publishing BBC work for public consumption here in the UK. The BBC litigation department would soon have us up in court. The BBC have their own publication company that sells most of their output that appears in your archive. How do you get away with it?

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Poster: Video-Cellar Date: Feb 23, 2010 5:42am
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: PD & Stautes of Limitations

The BBC does not like the British public (the people who fund it, primarily) to know the simple fact that, under UK law, Brodcast programmes are protected for a flat period of 50 years from date of first broadcast. The law states that retransmission or "format shifting" does not create a separate copyright. If something originates as a brodcast it remains a broadcast for copyright purposes. Broadcasts made before 1 July 1957 are not covered by any form of copyright.

The BBC often states incorrectly that Broadcast copyright refers to the electronic signal however the law is clearly worded "broadcast or cable programme".

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14 Duration of copyright in broadcasts and cable programmes

(1) Copyright in a broadcast or cable programme expires at the end of the period of 50 years from the end of the calendar year in which the broadcast was made or the programme was included in a cable programme service.

(2) Copyright in a repeat broadcast or cable programme expires at the same time as the copyright in the original broadcast or cable programme; and accordingly no copyright arises in respect of a repeat broadcast or cable programme which is broadcast or included in a cable programme service after the expiry of the copyright in the original broadcast or cable programme.

(3) A repeat broadcast or cable programme means one which is a repeat either of a broadcast previously made or of a cable programme previously included in a cable programme service.
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As for film copyrights in the UK there are three separate term calculations, under the terms of the 1988 Copyright Designs and Patents Act:

1. Films released befor 1 July 1957 are not treated as Cinematographic films. Instead they are protected as a series of photgraphs and sounds. If the film is a dramatic work the copyright lasts for 50-70 years after the death of the author of the film (usually defined as the director.) If it is a non dramatic film it is 50 years from first publication.

2. For films released between 1 July 1957 and 1 August 1989, the transitional terms of the 1988 act state that these films are protected for the term that they were granted under the 1956 Copyright Act. This is 50 years from being completed or 50 years from first publication if that occurs within 50 years of being completed.

3. For films release 1 August 1989 and after, the copyright term is life of the last surviving principal author (Director, Author, Composer) + 70 years.

This post was modified by Video-Cellar on 2010-02-23 13:42:15

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Poster: Ganbachi Date: Feb 26, 2010 7:09am
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: PD & Stautes of Limitations

Hi Video-Cellar,

I was just reading the above, particlarly:

"2. For films released between 1 July 1957 and 1 August 1989, the transitional terms of the 1988 act state that these films are protected for the term that they were granted under the 1956 Copyright Act. This is 50 years from being completed or 50 years from first publication if that occurs within 50 years of being completed."

So I compiled a little list of films, made in the UK, released between 1 July 1957 and 31 December 1959.

The Abominable Snowman (1957)
Cat Girl (1957)
Night of the Demon (1957 - aka Curse of the Demon)
The Cosmic Monster (1958)
The Crawling Eye (1958)
Blood of the Vampire (1958)
Corridors of Blood (1958)
The Revenge of Frankenstein (1958)
Dracula (1958)
Fiend without a Face (1958)
The Woman Eater (1958)
The Mummy (1959)
The Headless Ghost (1959)
The Giant Behemoth (1959)
Crime in the Museum of Horrors (1959)
The Hound of the Baskevilles (1959)
Jack the Ripper (1959)
First Man into Space (1959)

Would these be ok for uploading? - (I don't have them all but I'm hoping!).

This post was modified by Ganbachi on 2010-02-26 15:09:16

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Poster: skybandit Date: Feb 26, 2010 7:58am
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: PD & Stautes of Limitations

According to Video Cellar, Fiend without a Face (1958), Hound of the Baskevilles (1959) and Night of the Demon (1957 - aka Curse of the Demon) are all copyright.

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Poster: Ganbachi Date: Feb 26, 2010 8:53am
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: PD & Stautes of Limitations

I guess the US distributors got a hold on them but they were all 'published' first in the UK so they should be covered by UK law!